If you need braces to straighten your teeth or perhaps for your child, you are probably wondering: how much braces cost? This question is potentially the most popular question asked, but also the most difficult to answer. It is important to know that factors that will influence the cost of braces are case difficulty, length of treatment, and possible insurance coverage.

It is impossible to give an exact cost for treatment until a preliminary consultation has taken place and an orthodontic treatment plan has been created. Orthodontic fees are affordable and vary depending on the complexity of the problem, especially if extractions or surgery is necessary. Patients with severe problems usually require additional treatment time (and additional fees) than a less complicated scenario. Because every person is different, each case is evaluated independently. During a consultation — we estimate fees and explain what is included and try to ensure that affordability is at the forefront.

Individuals should note that the earlier (meaning age – the Canadian Orthodontic Association recommends patients come in starting at the age of 7) a patient comes in for a free consultation the easier it is to provide treatment because there is an assessment of the plan dependent on how the jaws grow.

Here are some of the specific factors that go into determining the cost of braces.

How much work do you need to have done?

Many people assume that braces work by themselves to correct a person’s smile. This is not true. Often there are a few months or even years of preparatory work to get the patient’s mouth ready for the braces. Some people might need to have to have teeth extractions or surgery to start the process before the actual brackets and wires are put in. Then, after the braces are taken off, the patient will still need to wear retainers for a number of months. The amount of work that surrounds the wearing of the braces will be a large factor in determining the cost of braces.

How long will the patient need to wear the braces?

Some people only need to wear braces for six months to a year. Others need to wear them as long as two and a half years. Obviously, the longer you need to wear the braces, the more the cost of the braces will be. After all, you are paying for more than the metal brackets and wires. You are also paying for orthodontic time and expertise.

What kind of braces will you wear?

Long gone are the days when braces were just metal brackets and metal wires. Now braces can be made out of ceramic and plastic materials as well as metal. Not only that, but the different materials can be made into different shapes as well. Braces really have come a long way. The material you choose for your braces will affect the amount that you will end up paying for them.

While it might be easier to understand if there was a standard price for braces, but unfortunately there isn’t. Instead, there are a number of outside situations that will influence the final cost of braces. These factors can include additional devices that are worn by the patient, x-rays, any surgery that needs to be done, the materials used and the amount of time the braces need to be worn.

While a standard cost of braces is difficult to ascertain, at Aura Orthodontics, we help devise a payment plan which best meets a patient’s needs. In addition, we explain the exact cost of treatment, and outline the various payment schedules during the initial consultation. Patients usually wonder if they are able to obtain financing. The answer is yes. Aura Orthodontics offers a variety of flexible affordable monthly payment plans, many with low down payment and no interest. There are also a number of payment “plans” and payment modalities (VISA, MasterCard, Debit, and cheque) to accommodate a patient’s needs.

The cost of braces should never keep you from achieving the smile you have always wanted. Getting that perfect smile is an important investment because you are investing in yourself, which can pay important dividends in terms of self-esteem, confidence, career and relationships.

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